Cy Ashley Webb

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Cy spent the ‘80’s as a bench scientist, the tech boom doing intellectual property law, and the first decade of the millennium, aspiring to be the world’s oldest grad student at Stanford where she is interested in political martyrdom. Presently, she enjoys writing for Stark Insider and the SF Examiner, hanging out at Palo Alto Children's Theatre, and participating in various political activities. Democracy is not a spectator sport! Cy is a SFBATCC member.
Cy Ashley Webb - Announcement

Goodbye to All That / The Journey Continues

Twenty-eight years ago, my late husband and I packed up lock, stock, and litter box, schlepping a 52 pound portable computer (386 processor), three cats and two rabbits, and migrated from Boston to Silicon Valley, catching the tail end of the killer app boom (back when the phrase “killer app”...
The Velocity of Autumn - Review @ TheatreWorks Silicon Valley

Bone-chilling Fast: ‘The Velocity of Autumn’

Playwright Eric Coble loves his characters, and lavishes them both with one-liners that ring so true they occasionally raised a gasp of recognition from the audience.
(l to r) Ellen McLaughlin (Wendy) and Kathleen Chalfant (Ann) in Sarah Ruhl’s For Peter Pan on her 70th birthday at Berkeley Rep.

Not Quite Aloft: ‘For Peter Pan on her 70th Birthday’ (Berkeley Rep)

The magic in this play is all in that fantastical morphing, which shimmers in its quiet way, infusing the play with lightness and warmth. The catch is you have to wait until the last third to get there.
Will Durst in Elect to Laugh 2016 at The Marsh San Francisco

Elect to Laugh 2016: Again and again

Quick to connect with the audience, Will Durst alternates knowing insults and ego stokes, always taking the audience’s pulse.

‘Last Five Years’ a sleeper hit at A.C.T. San Francisco (Review)

The imaginative geometries created by Roberts Wierzel’s lighting design are so striking that whole dissertations could be directed at explicating how their crisp precision advances the plot in ways that hold one’s attention without being intentionally attention-getting.
Smuin Ballet - Dance Series Two

Another shot of Helen Pickett’s choreography with the Smuin Ballet’s current offering

This piece, which speaks to a sense of loss and dislocation, is not without bits of complete silliness. Performed by six dancers, it relies on traveling moves and carries to create interesting geometries.
The Lighthouse - Opera Parallele Review

Wrapped in fog, ‘The Lighthouse’ makes perfect music (Review)

Davies’ score is rife with unexpected turns, as irregularly unpredictable as the sound of creaking timbers on a New England whaling ship in a nor’easter,
Palo Alto Players - Into the Woods - Stark Insider Review

‘Into the Woods’ at Palo Alto Players (Review)

Into the Woods is a difficult show to perform, demanding split-second responses, with nary a rest. Fairytale characters busily weave their assorted tales, while simultaneously operating on a whole different level to subtly remind us that these archetypes live in our heads, inhabiting some deep part of ourselves. These...
SFGMC Tales of Our City Spring Concert Review

Opening the Pearly Gates: SF Gay Men’s Chorus at Davies

The audience was on their feet before raconteur, writer and de facto social historian Armistead Maupin regaled the audience without resorting to the old saw, he said, of “walking ten miles through the snow for a blow job."
Boeing Boeing Review

Friendly Skies: ‘Boeing Boeing’ (Review)

Part of the tight fast-paced brilliance, sold here in a Mary Quant vision of primary colors and angular geometries, can be attributed to Kenneth Kelleher’s tight stage direction and the cast’s quick comic timing.