Review: Early Music Singers do Compline at Stanford

    Although this is liturgical music in a Christian setting, the beauty of the music transcends narrow religious limitations.

    In Review

    Compline at Stanford

    Memorial Church, Stanford University
    9:00 PM on Sunday evenings throughout the academic year
    Review by

    You know the academic year is back in force when some iota of time on Sundays is spend cajoling friends to come to Compline at Stanford. Regardless how persuasive I’ve been, when it gets to be 8:30 PM, I usually find some reason to drop what I’m doing to jump in the car and make it to the 9:00 PM Compline.

    Yesterday, the brief half hour canonical office was sung by the Early Music Singers. The Early Music Singers sang Compline at Stanford several times last year – and their return was particularly appreciated. Alternating between austere plainchant and intricately woven polyphony, their voices filled the darkened Memorial Church, bringing the audience back to a point of focus.

    Although this is liturgical music in a Christian setting, the beauty of the music transcends narrow religious limitations. After a year of doing Compline, I can honestly say I’ve never been disappointed. Admission is free, and the half hour spent in the darkened church listening to exquisite music puts a bookend on the week that is over. Despite the setting and the music, this doesn’t wreak of religiousity, but rather a quiet appreciation for voices engaging in a very old and very disciplined practice.

    I’m looking forward to next week’s Compline – sung by the Palo Alto High School choir. They were truly exceptional last year, as their large choir had a power unlike most of the other Compline groups – and I trust they will be the same this year.

    Compline is at 9:00 PM. This is one of the few times parking on the oval in front of Memorial Church is readily accessible. It is well worth checking out during the academic year.

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    Cy Ashley Webb
    Cy spent the ‘80’s as a bench scientist, the tech boom doing intellectual property law, and the first decade of the millennium, aspiring to be the world’s oldest grad student at Stanford where she is interested in political martyrdom. Presently, she enjoys writing for Stark Insider and the SF Examiner, hanging out at Palo Alto Children's Theatre, and participating in various political activities. Democracy is not a spectator sport! Cy is a SFBATCC member.
    • Eccefilius

      Sorry to point out the obvious but the beliefs which inspired this music — “narrow religious limitations” as you call them — literally define the music and give it meaning. Of course one needn’t be Catholic to appreciate the beauty of the music but the “limitations” properly understood actually deepen appreciation. I actually think the only limitation is the prejudice of the author.