Loreto Bay golf course illustrated guide and photos

With no less than 10 photos of the course, it really gives you a sense of the beauty of the scenery. Drew played a 9-hole round starting at the 10th tee.

Loreto Bay Golf Course

Loreto Bay Golf Course

Those interested in golf in Loreto and progress of the course at the Inn at Loreto Bay should enjoy reading Drew’s new post “Golf Anyone” on his Living Loreto blog. It’s the most comprehensive report I’ve seen yet. With no less than 10 photos of the course, it really gives you a sense of the beauty of the scenery. Drew played a 9-hole round starting at the 10th tee.

Drew summarizes it best:

Whether you are a scratch golfer or a wanna-be duffer, this course is, at the very least, a wonderful excuse to spend a couple of hours surrounded by the beauty of our community, with breathtaking views of the mountains, the sea, the estuaries and, not least of all, the multi-coloured, many towered homescape that is becoming the Villages of Loreto Bay. So, regardless of your skills, golf is going to be an important part of “Living Loreto”.

I have not played the course yet, but look forward to it soon. Whenever we visit Loreto we are astounded at the amount of effort it takes to maintain the course. It’s hard enough in a regular climate in the US or Canada, but maintaining a lush course in the middle of the Baja desert is quite the feat.

Read the article “Golf Anyone” here.

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  • Jamie Holts

    I finally decided to write a comment on your blog. I just wanted to say good job. I really enjoy reading your posts.

  • Jamie Holts

    I finally decided to write a comment on your blog. I just wanted to say good job. I really enjoy reading your posts.

  • Jamie Holts

    I finally decided to write a comment on your blog. I just wanted to say good job. I really enjoy reading your posts.

  • eufemio

    HOLA idiotos!! <br />
    <br />
    The mentira (lie for you gringos) was that &quot;Loreto Bay will create more water than it consumes&quot; I'm not making that up. <br />
    <br />
    Now for you Loreto Bay ecologists canadienses- when you irrigate the DESERT in the middle of the freaking day more evaporation takes place than when you water in the early morning hours when evaporation takes place at a lower rate. Where the hell did you get your degrees?? didn't anyone tell you this? <br />
    <br />
    The proof is in the photo above *******.<br />
    <br />
    Well we proud Loretanos aren't as stupid a bunch as you think. You are stealing our water and it won't go on much longer. We will unite and cut you off so be ready.

  • eufemio

    HOLA idiotos!!

    The mentira (lie for you gringos) was that “Loreto Bay will create more water than it consumes” I’m not making that up.

    Now for you Loreto Bay ecologists canadienses- when you irrigate the DESERT in the middle of the freaking day more evaporation takes place than when you water in the early morning hours when evaporation takes place at a lower rate. Where the hell did you get your degrees?? didn’t anyone tell you this?

    The proof is in the photo above *******.

    Well we proud Loretanos aren’t as stupid a bunch as you think. You are stealing our water and it won’t go on much longer. We will unite and cut you off so be ready.

  • eufemio

    HOLA idiotos!!

    The mentira (lie for you gringos) was that “Loreto Bay will create more water than it consumes” I’m not making that up.

    Now for you Loreto Bay ecologists canadienses- when you irrigate the DESERT in the middle of the freaking day more evaporation takes place than when you water in the early morning hours when evaporation takes place at a lower rate. Where the hell did you get your degrees?? didn’t anyone tell you this?

    The proof is in the photo above *******.

    Well we proud Loretanos aren’t as stupid a bunch as you think. You are stealing our water and it won’t go on much longer. We will unite and cut you off so be ready.

  • king cabana

    Acuerdo!<br />
    <br />
    I believe that golf courses, in general, are one of the most ecologically devastating influences on the planet today (thanks Fonatur)… watering them in the heat of the day not withstanding. This is NOT why we wished to travel to and invest in Loreto Bay. I can only commit to trying to abrogate for my own negative influence here- duped as I may have been into believing a sales pitch about sustainability, environmental stewardship, resource conservation (water) and community improvement. At this point, I would encourage all community members- emigrants and xenophobic indigenous people alike- is to work together toward encouraging ACTUAL water management.

  • buildgreenman

    The Loreto Bay golf course does have some merit points. Admittedly, a golf course in the desert is not exactly sustainable. But. Here are some facts:<br />
    All the original (Fonatur)Bermuda grass, an invasive, water and fertilizer guzzler, plus a foot of soil, was dug up and composted<br />
    A slow-growing paspalum hybrid grass was planted – uses a fraction of the water and fertilizer, and is salt tolerant (up to 3000 parts per million)<br />
    It is irrigated with only treated waste water from the sewage treatment plant – NO potable water. [What is amazing is that about 60% of Loreto's water supply is wasted through leaks. Water fees in Loreto are not based on use (no meters!), so there is no incentive to conserve, as witnessed by wholesale watering of streets for dust control, leaking hoses etc. Ragging on Loreto Bay for using &quot;Loreto's&quot; water (in fact the San Juan de Londo water supply was developed by Fonatur for both Nopolo and Loreto)is simply hypocritical. At least Loreto Bay is trying to conserve, specifying dual flush toilets, irrigating with waste water etc.]<br />
    The irrigation system is computer controlled, tied in with a digital weather station and monitors so irrigation happens only when required – no over-watering. Yes, please tell those guys that watering mid-day is just plain nuts – their algorithm needs changing.<br />
    There is grass only in golf play areas – all else is native landscaping. Only the grass is irrigated.<br />
    Loreto Bay planted a continuous strip of halophytes (succulent plants) around the Punta Nopolo estuary, filtering storm water runoff and preventing erosion.<br />
    The golf course has been designed as a storm water retention area, to prevent any contaminants from washing directly to the sea.<br />
    Landscaping will provide a riparian corridor for wild animals, and provides habitat for native birds and insects (and needs no irrigation after it is established). 3 bat houses have been installed.<br />
    A lot of tourists love the golf course – and spend lots of money in Loreto businesses.<br />
    I know, no development is good development. But Fonatur started this – be thankful that the first big developer in town has really made an effort to do things better. Like restoring estuaries and mangroves, trying to set up a wind farm for its electrical needs, planning a community to be less reliant on cars (well, eventually), not building a gated community, not building high rise fractionals, recycling (hey, Loreto, when are you going to join the 20th, let alone the 21st century, and start recycling all that trash you generate?) So many opportunities to collaborate, work together, make the best of it, but while the local economy boomed, it has been easier for locals to gripe about the evil developer. Hey, GEA, you can't blame Loreto Bay for collapsing fish stocks in the Gulf of California. I digress. The smart thing to do is to draw a line around Loreto (and La Paz) and say ZERO development everywhere else – it is the natural beauty of the coastline that is the big draw. Develop, by all means, but do it densely and wisely – energy and water efficient, native landscaping, managing waste etc. Then you can have the best of both worlds – a more sustainable future.

  • king cabana

    Acuerdo!

    I believe that golf courses, in general, are one of the most ecologically devastating influences on the planet today (thanks Fonatur)… watering them in the heat of the day not withstanding. This is NOT why we wished to travel to and invest in Loreto Bay. I can only commit to trying to abrogate for my own negative influence here- duped as I may have been into believing a sales pitch about sustainability, environmental stewardship, resource conservation (water) and community improvement. At this point, I would encourage all community members- emigrants and xenophobic indigenous people alike- is to work together toward encouraging ACTUAL water management.

  • king cabana

    Acuerdo!

    I believe that golf courses, in general, are one of the most ecologically devastating influences on the planet today (thanks Fonatur)… watering them in the heat of the day not withstanding. This is NOT why we wished to travel to and invest in Loreto Bay. I can only commit to trying to abrogate for my own negative influence here- duped as I may have been into believing a sales pitch about sustainability, environmental stewardship, resource conservation (water) and community improvement. At this point, I would encourage all community members- emigrants and xenophobic indigenous people alike- is to work together toward encouraging ACTUAL water management.

  • buildgreenman

    The Loreto Bay golf course does have some merit points. Admittedly, a golf course in the desert is not exactly sustainable. But. Here are some facts:
    All the original (Fonatur)Bermuda grass, an invasive, water and fertilizer guzzler, plus a foot of soil, was dug up and composted
    A slow-growing paspalum hybrid grass was planted – uses a fraction of the water and fertilizer, and is salt tolerant (up to 3000 parts per million)
    It is irrigated with only treated waste water from the sewage treatment plant – NO potable water. [What is amazing is that about 60% of Loreto’s water supply is wasted through leaks. Water fees in Loreto are not based on use (no meters!), so there is no incentive to conserve, as witnessed by wholesale watering of streets for dust control, leaking hoses etc. Ragging on Loreto Bay for using “Loreto’s” water (in fact the San Juan de Londo water supply was developed by Fonatur for both Nopolo and Loreto)is simply hypocritical. At least Loreto Bay is trying to conserve, specifying dual flush toilets, irrigating with waste water etc.]
    The irrigation system is computer controlled, tied in with a digital weather station and monitors so irrigation happens only when required – no over-watering. Yes, please tell those guys that watering mid-day is just plain nuts – their algorithm needs changing.
    There is grass only in golf play areas – all else is native landscaping. Only the grass is irrigated.
    Loreto Bay planted a continuous strip of halophytes (succulent plants) around the Punta Nopolo estuary, filtering storm water runoff and preventing erosion.
    The golf course has been designed as a storm water retention area, to prevent any contaminants from washing directly to the sea.
    Landscaping will provide a riparian corridor for wild animals, and provides habitat for native birds and insects (and needs no irrigation after it is established). 3 bat houses have been installed.
    A lot of tourists love the golf course – and spend lots of money in Loreto businesses.
    I know, no development is good development. But Fonatur started this – be thankful that the first big developer in town has really made an effort to do things better. Like restoring estuaries and mangroves, trying to set up a wind farm for its electrical needs, planning a community to be less reliant on cars (well, eventually), not building a gated community, not building high rise fractionals, recycling (hey, Loreto, when are you going to join the 20th, let alone the 21st century, and start recycling all that trash you generate?) So many opportunities to collaborate, work together, make the best of it, but while the local economy boomed, it has been easier for locals to gripe about the evil developer. Hey, GEA, you can’t blame Loreto Bay for collapsing fish stocks in the Gulf of California. I digress. The smart thing to do is to draw a line around Loreto (and La Paz) and say ZERO development everywhere else – it is the natural beauty of the coastline that is the big draw. Develop, by all means, but do it densely and wisely – energy and water efficient, native landscaping, managing waste etc. Then you can have the best of both worlds – a more sustainable future.

  • buildgreenman

    The Loreto Bay golf course does have some merit points. Admittedly, a golf course in the desert is not exactly sustainable. But. Here are some facts:
    All the original (Fonatur)Bermuda grass, an invasive, water and fertilizer guzzler, plus a foot of soil, was dug up and composted
    A slow-growing paspalum hybrid grass was planted – uses a fraction of the water and fertilizer, and is salt tolerant (up to 3000 parts per million)
    It is irrigated with only treated waste water from the sewage treatment plant – NO potable water. [What is amazing is that about 60% of Loreto’s water supply is wasted through leaks. Water fees in Loreto are not based on use (no meters!), so there is no incentive to conserve, as witnessed by wholesale watering of streets for dust control, leaking hoses etc. Ragging on Loreto Bay for using “Loreto’s” water (in fact the San Juan de Londo water supply was developed by Fonatur for both Nopolo and Loreto)is simply hypocritical. At least Loreto Bay is trying to conserve, specifying dual flush toilets, irrigating with waste water etc.]
    The irrigation system is computer controlled, tied in with a digital weather station and monitors so irrigation happens only when required – no over-watering. Yes, please tell those guys that watering mid-day is just plain nuts – their algorithm needs changing.
    There is grass only in golf play areas – all else is native landscaping. Only the grass is irrigated.
    Loreto Bay planted a continuous strip of halophytes (succulent plants) around the Punta Nopolo estuary, filtering storm water runoff and preventing erosion.
    The golf course has been designed as a storm water retention area, to prevent any contaminants from washing directly to the sea.
    Landscaping will provide a riparian corridor for wild animals, and provides habitat for native birds and insects (and needs no irrigation after it is established). 3 bat houses have been installed.
    A lot of tourists love the golf course – and spend lots of money in Loreto businesses.
    I know, no development is good development. But Fonatur started this – be thankful that the first big developer in town has really made an effort to do things better. Like restoring estuaries and mangroves, trying to set up a wind farm for its electrical needs, planning a community to be less reliant on cars (well, eventually), not building a gated community, not building high rise fractionals, recycling (hey, Loreto, when are you going to join the 20th, let alone the 21st century, and start recycling all that trash you generate?) So many opportunities to collaborate, work together, make the best of it, but while the local economy boomed, it has been easier for locals to gripe about the evil developer. Hey, GEA, you can’t blame Loreto Bay for collapsing fish stocks in the Gulf of California. I digress. The smart thing to do is to draw a line around Loreto (and La Paz) and say ZERO development everywhere else – it is the natural beauty of the coastline that is the big draw. Develop, by all means, but do it densely and wisely – energy and water efficient, native landscaping, managing waste etc. Then you can have the best of both worlds – a more sustainable future.

  • Salt Water Cleanse

    I’m so love this blog, already bookmarked it! Thanks.